How To Adjust A Rear Derailleur

Items Required To Adjust Your Rear Derailleur

  • Screwdriver
  • 5 mm Allen Wrench

Follow These Steps To Adjust Your Rear Derailleur 

1. Locate your high limit screw - this screw controls how far the derailleur will want to shift the chain off the smallest cog.
  • Shift into the smallest cog and back the screw out a few turns.
  • This should cause the chain to want to shift off the cog (You'll hear a clicking sound when pedaling).
  • Thread the screw in until the noise goes away.

2. Locate your low limit screw - this screw controls how far the derailleur will want to shift the chain off the biggest cog.
  • Shift up into the biggest cog and back the screw out a few turns.
  • This may cause the chain to want to shift off the cog into your spokes.
  • Thread the screw in until you are able to pedal smoothly again.
  • If you thread the screw in too far, you won't be able to shift up into the biggest cog. Back the screw out a bit if this is the case.

3. The top derailleur pulley should be as close to the cassette cogs as possible. If it's too close, it might cause rubbing or noise. If it's too far away, shifting will be sloppy.
  • Locate the B-tension screw. Thread it in or out in order to adjust the top derailleur pulley.

4. Cable tension is important. Cycle through your gears to determine whether your cable tension is too low, too high, or just right.
  • More often than not, your cable tension will be too low. This means your derailleur is hesitating when shifting up into a bigger cog. If this is the case, unthread the barrel adjuster located on the shifter by a click or two. Each click makes a huge difference.
  • If you go too far and your cable tension is too high, thread the barrel adjuster in.
Voila! Enjoy crisp, clean, precise shifting!
 

Disclaimer: This guide to adjusting your rear derailleur is for informational purposes only. It is not intended as a "Do It Yourself" guide to bike adjustment or maintenance, nor as a substitute for professional advice and service. Always have your bike serviced and inspected by a certified bike technician.

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